Book Reviews

Recursion by Blake Crouch Book Review

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When NYC cop Barry Sutton responds to a call about a woman on a building rooftop about to jump off, she told him that she’s got FMS, or False Memory Syndrome.

She recalled having pain at the back of her head and an awful nosebleed, and then suddenly having all these memories of another life where she was a mother to a nine-year-old boy named Sam and a wife to her husband Joe Behrman. They lived in Vermont, and she and her husband owned a landscaping business.

From the memories that she saw, she knew they were a very happy family.

But how could that be possible when she’s single and works as an investment banker in New York?

The last thing the woman said before jumping to her death was “My son has been erased.”

This is how the story begins, and what follows is a mind-bending, death-defying adventure that travels through different timelines, from the present to as far back as the 1980s,culminating in all things shocking, horrific, or heartbreaking.

It’s up to Barry and Helena, the neuroscientist responsible for creating the technology that’s changing the world and altering people’s memories, to step in and do the right thing before the mistake becomes irreversible and plunges all of mankind into death and destruction.

I’m a huge Blake Crouch fan. When I found out that he had a new book coming out, of course I had to read it the day it gets released!

I enjoyed his previous book, Dark Matter, immensely. Recursion is in the same boat as Dark Matter, but this is really wild, entertaining, shocking, fast-paced, thought-provoking, and yes, romantic even.

It can get pretty confusing when Barry and Helena start jumping to different timelines. It also gets too scientific at one point, but the action never stops.

Pay attention to the dates every new chapter and you’ll be just fine.

I just read that there will be a Netflix adaptation, and it will be both a movie and a series, with Shonda Rhimes and Matt Reeves at the helm. Well, that was quick! It will be really cool to see all those timeline jumps.

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Book Reviews

Maybe in Another Life by Taylor Jenkins Reid

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Twenty-nine-year-old Hannah Martin has lived in more cities than a normal twenty-nine-year-old woman would in her lifetime. Too many cities to count, and with no solid roots formed or real memories to cherish. It had to take an affair with a married man and a lashing from his vicious wife to convince her to just move back home to Los Angeles. It would be wonderful to reconnect with everybody. Especially with best friend Gabby, and her parents who practically raised Hannah when she was in high school. The idea did not sound so bad at all. So move back to L.A. Hannah did.

One beautiful night in the town, out with old high school friends and one very special high school ex-boyfriend that she never really stopped loving, Hannah finds herself at a crossroads of sorts. She has no clue how this is about to change everything.

The repercussions of Hannah’s seemingly simple decision are laid out in alternating chapters. Two storylines occurring simultaneously: one, had Hannah chosen to leave the party early, and two, had Hannah decided to stay behind and spend the night with Ethan.

In both alternate realities, Hannah comes to terms with her decisions and deals with the consequences for her and the people in her life. She is forced to grow up, build a home, and make a life for herself, whether she likes to or not. And along the way, she finally finds the real meaning of what it’s like to really be home.

From the same author that gave us “Forever, Interrupted” and “After I Do” comes another delightfully different, soul-crushingly romantic, smart and intriguing love story. It’s about parallel universes in the most unscientific, most romantic, most feel-good way possible.

Like her two previous novels, “Maybe In Another Life” is brilliantly crafted, emotional, and thought provoking. It’s an honest portrayal of life and love, and all of their certainties and uncertainties. Reading it felt like there’s a life coach talking in there, hiding somewhere between the pages. You will love Hannah, as well as the people she loves, even possibly share her obsessive love for cinnamon rolls and messy hair buns. It’s a happy tale that tells you that no matter which road you take, what decision you make, or which guy you choose, love and happiness are possible. Everything is a possibility.

“Everything that is possible happens. That means that when you flip a quarter, it comes down heads and tails. Not heads or tails. Every time you flip a coin and it comes up heads, you are merely in the universe where the coin came up heads. There is another version of you out there, created the second the quarter flipped, who saw it come up tails. Every second of every day, the world is splitting further and further into an infinite number of parallel universes, where everything that could happen is happening. There are millions, trillions, or quadrillions, I guess, of different versions of ourselves living out the consequences of our choices. What I’m getting at is that I know there may be universes out there where I made different choices and they led me to somewhere else, led me to someone else. And my heart breaks for every single version of me that didn’t end up with you.”

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